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Currently I am still on maternity leave, and I will be going back to work after the new year holiday.  However, I have been working on writing more since the baby is becoming easier to handle. I am now also an expert at typing with one hand so I can hold the baby while writing.  Here are some of the new things I have done in the past couple months.

First of all, I applied for a freelance print magazine assignment on a whim, and I was offered the job.  It was quite fun researching the topic and finally writing and editing my piece.  Hopefully I will get more assignments in the future since the pay is actually quite good. I feel that I should write a new resume specifically for my freelance writing.  Right now I have a pretty decent resume for my software engineering experience, but I do not have any writing related experience listed there because it is non-relevant to software engineering.

Next, I started writing for ‘s sister blog .  I am planning to write down more mommy-related experiences on Parenting Squad since they are on topic.  It is pretty fun to write these stories down, and I think if the blog stays around long enough it would be hilarious to show my kid the stories once he is old enough to read.

Finally, I am working on building some more websites for affiliate/adsense income.  I built one at the beginning of this year as an experiment and barely updated it, and so far in a year it made a profit of $200 or so.  It is not bad considering that there is very little overhead to keeping the site around.  I really need to research good keywords and affiliate programs to make it more profitable, though.

Since my husband went back to work this month, it has been really quiet around the house.  Even though I am keeping myself busy I feel that I still need some human interaction, so I am sort of looking forward to going back to work.  On the other hand I really enjoy working on my own and spending all the time I want with my baby.    Another thing I realized in these few months is that I will probably do fine without a permanent job, too.  I have many skills that I could make a living with as long as I use them and work towards my goals.

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In the past couple months a couple of my family members have been making offers on bank owned properties as investments.  Without going into too much detail, they are buying properties with positive cash flow when rented out.   It is harder than it looks, and there are good deals out there.  However, here are some of my thoughts as to why I would not be investing in a rental property.

First of all, it takes a lot of time and energy to find a suitable property that has positive cash flow.  My hubby and I just don’t have the time  or drive to go house hunting right now with a new baby.  My hubby simply thinks it is too much trouble.  When we bought our house from his parents all he did was sign the final mortgage papers, and he thought that was too much trouble.  I cannot imagine how annoyed he would be if we actually went on a house hunt and attended endless open houses.   I am actually glad that we purchased the house he grew up in because that saved us a ton of time and gas  in choosing a house  (and probably saved us some  arguments since I have seen how my parents bought their houses).  Since our assets are combined, there is no point in investing in something that the hubby does not want to deal with.

Second,    it takes quite a bit of cash to buy investment properties these days.  We have very good credit, but there is little chance that we will beat out investors with full cash offers.  I just don’t feel comfortable putting so much cash into a rental property because that would make our investments too heavy on real estate.    It is never good to put all your eggs into one basket.

Basically, we are not really in a very good position  to buy rental property now, but for some people that have a lot of time and money on their hands there are good deals out there since the real estate market tanked so much.  I think these opportunities will stick around for at least a couple more years.   The rental market has gone down in general, but many people are moving out of apartments and moving into single family homes because the rent price on single family homes have gone down.  There are also a lot of people who were foreclosed on renting now, so it is still possible to rent out a property.  The key is to do your research and find something with a positive rate of return, and don’t overextend yourself with too much financing.

Anyway,  I don’t think my husband and I like being landlords because it involves collecting money from real people.  It is great when you have a good, long term tenant, but when you .   It is much easier to just collect interest from a bond or CD because it is a lot less personal.   When you buy stocks and mutual funds you could lose money, but at least you won’t lose your life and your car won’t get keyed.  Actual human beings  are just too unpredictable of an investment.

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Today my hubby went back to work after spending 7 weeks with me and the baby.  He is a really hands on dad and he calms the baby down better than I can in some instances.  In these weeks he also got a lot of gaming time and he loved it and needless to say he didn’t want to go back today. I think having the baby and this break made us  reaffirm our desire to reach financial independence as soon as possible so that we can enjoy our time the way we want to.    So here is a quick review  to where we are and where we need to be.

Since we got married we have been, and right now I think we are still on track to “retiring” in 7 to 10 years as long as we both work and continue to save and invest.  Last year I wrote that I only , and that makes the deadline 2015.  That is an extremely stretch goal now that we have a baby and  a house.  However, if we pay off the house as soon as possible we will eliminate a pretty big fixed expense and it would be easier for us to retire since housing costs the most after taxes.  I have made a budget for us if we stopped working and paid off the house, and assuming that I still have my current blog income we would only need to withdraw around $25000 a year from our nest egg to live fairly  comfortably.    That means we don’t really need $1.4 million in our nestegg.  A smaller nestegg of 650,000 to 750,000 would be enough as long as we stick to a safe withdrawal rate of 4% and manage it carefully.  This would be what Jacob at calls a “25 year emergency fund”.  Of course, if you include a paid off home the entire portfolio would be worth over $1 million.  Essentially, the money we pay into the home will essentially be generating the rent money we would have paid.  In the long term of 50 to 60 years paying off the home and living in it is still worthwhile since rent will go up.  In California property taxes cannot go up by more than 2% a year due to proposition 13 so according to my calculation it would take around 72 years for our property tax to go up to an average rent price now.  By then we are probably dead anyway.

There are also a couple other advantages to “retiring” early.  First of all, we will still have some income, but it will be a lot less than what we earn now.  This means we will pay a lot less taxes and qualify for more tax credits.  Additionally, having less income is advantageous when it comes time for our baby to apply for college financial aid.  The current FAFSA system looks at parental income to determine how much a student should receive in aid, and some private colleges give large grants to low and middle income families.  As I wrote in , sometimes the same scholarship offers huge discrepancies in monetary award just because of parental income.  As long as we raise our kid well, then we could possibly save a bundle by retiring before he applies for college because we would have financial need based on income.  Don’t get me wrong, we are saving for his college fund, too, but we would rather spend more time with our baby and let him work for the bulk of his college financing since he will be an adult then.

Anyway, we are really in love with our baby now, and hopefully we can achieve financial independence in less than 10 years because he will still be a kid then.  We might have another kid, too, but that won’t happen for a couple years.  I really feel like I’m living in that Nationwide tagline “life comes at you fast”  because so many life changing things have happened since I started writing here.  It is pretty awesome, and I am thankful.

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In the last couple days at the campuses of the University of California.  They are waving signs such as “Don’t take our education away”, and “affordable education for all”.  As an alumna of UC Berkeley, here is what I think about the issue.

First of all, I think that these students are just unlucky to be attending the UC system during the worst recession in several generations.  The California government operates on boom and bust cycles.  If you look at the historic tuition in the UC system, you will see that tuition has actually  gone down before in the late 90s because the economy was booming.  When I attended UC Berkeley in 2001, I was actually paying less than a student who attended in 1994 if you account for inflation.  In fact, I met an alumnus who graduated in the early 90s later on at an internship and he was really surprised that my tuition was just a little bit above his.  Basically, I was lucky and graduated before the major fee increases started.  The fact of the matter is that the state spends everything they have got when they are flush with money, and pretty much falls flat on its face when it is without money.  Right now, the state is just flat out broke.  The biggest problem here is that the tuition was not raised incrementally, and now the 32% increase is felt particularly hard by this group of students.  This is not the fault of the universities, but the state government in charge of the money.

Now, are the schools still affordable?  As of now, I think the UC tuition of approximately $10000 per year is still quite affordable if you compare how much an equivalent education at a private school costs.  UC Berkeley still has the top ranked engineering school in the country, and $10,000 a year is much less than $36,000 at MIT.  Similarly, the other UC campuses have some of the highest ranked programs in the country, and still cost 1/2 or  1/3rd of many private schools.  I actually think that the UCs were just too damn cheap for what they offer.  Even now, I think tuition at an UC would be less than what I will spend on childcare next year and I am not waving a sign that says “affordable childcare for all”.   Considering that UC graduates get paid comparable salaries as graduates of the ivies,  I still think that the UCs offer a great bang for the buck.

What really concerns me is that a lack of money could decrease the quality of the UC system.  If great professors, academics, and researchers no longer wanted to work at the UCs due to all the salary cuts and furloughs and the high cost of living in California then the education of many future young Californians will suffer.  I have no idea how much the schools will cost in 18 years when my baby goes to college, but if the quality of the schools go down then they might not be worth what they are charging. Perhaps in 18 years California will be in another boom cycle and the tuition will go down?

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If you have not heard, the monstrous 2000 page healthcare bill has passed in the House.  It will be debated in the Senate soon, but chances are it will pass in some form.  I am not going to go on about all the things that are wrong about it because that will take too long.  Instead, I will write about who could save money if this bill passes.

First of all, this bill is going to require everyone to buy  government approved health insurance or face a penalty from the IRS.  For individual tax payers, the penalty is   2.5% of gross pay.  For businesses, the tax penalty is 8% of a worker’s pay if the business does not pay for at least 72.5% of the worker’s health insurance premium.  There are also significant government subsidies for those who make under a certain income level to pay for premiums.

Additionally, there will be cuts to FSA and HSA plans and insurance companies will no longer be able to charge more premiums for preexisting conditions.  Also, the premium difference between the young and old will be lessened greatly.  The House bill says that the premium of an elderly person cannot be more than twice than that of a young person.  So essentially these changes will raise the price of health insurance for the young and healthy and punish those who try to save for their own medical expenses.

So what should the young and healthy do if this bill passes?  First of all, stay healthy.  Next,  if employed, ask the employer to give whatever they pay for your health insurance as a part of your pay instead if your employer is paying significantly more than 8% of your pay in health insurance premiums.  You will have to pay the 2.5% in tax penalty, and your employer will have to 8%, but you will have more cash in your pocket.  If you do get sick you will still be able to get insurance since the law basically says that everyone will be able to buy the same basic coverage regardless of preexisting conditions.

How do the numbers work out?  Here is from the Congressional Budget Office that shows how much the average health insurance premiums would be under the new plan for people in different income levels.  For a single person making around $38,000 a year, the estimated premium is $6100 a year, or 16% of income.  Suppose that this person is young and healthy and  simply pays for the tax penalty the cost is only $950 a year. Meanwhile, the person could save the difference.  Of course, right now this person pays no tax penalty, so the government is simply going to redistribute his or her money in subsidies for others.   If you look at the table, it seems that not a single income bracket pays less than 2.5% of their income for the premium, so even the poorest folks would do better to just skip health insurance while they are healthy, save the cash, and simply enroll when they do need to consume health care.  Of course, this will drive up health insurance premiums for everyone who is enrolled, and give more incentive for those who are enrolled to drop their coverage.

How does the math work out for employers?  Lets use the same employee making $38,000 as an example.  The employer is forced to pay 72.5% of the average premium of $6100, which is $4422.50  or  8% of 38,000 which is $3040.  Obviously, dropping the insurance is cheaper for the employer.  If the difference in cost were given to the employee directly then the employee still comes out ahead with more cash in his or her pocket.    When you go up in the income scale, the incentive is even higher to drop insurance.  For example, an employee making $102,000 a year with a family plan would cost   an employer around $15000 a year in insurance premiums or simply $8000 in tax penalties.  If the difference were given to that employee that employee would still come out ahead by several thousand dollars a year after the tax penalty.  That money could be used to pay for preventive care out of pocket.

Finally, lets examine why we have health insurance now.  It is to herbal viagra in australiaagainst future diseases  and healthcare consumption.  Your insurance doesn’t exactly buy you anything you can use right now.  For example, I was pregnant this year, and if I didn’t have health insurance to begin with  I would have had to pay quite a bit for the treatment I received.  Since pregnancy is a preexisting condition and I would not have been able to buy health insurance anywhere while pregnant.  Now if the new law passes, I could buy health insurance while pregnant since it would be illegal to refuse insurance to patients with preexisting conditions.  This completely changes the definition of insurance and makes it almost like a coupon program you can join at anytime.  Basically, your membership fee is your taxes, and then you can pay a middle layer of insurance companies when you need health care.  So, there is really no need to carry expensive health insurance that covers everything  when you are healthy because you can enroll anytime.

If all the young and healthy knew how to do basic math, they would be dropping their health insurance and opt for more cash  pay as soon as this bill is enacted.  Fortunately (or unfortunately) for Congress most American public schools aren’t so great so many people would become new insurance company customers because they cannot figure out that 2.5% is less of a penalty than the 15 or 16% they would be required to shell out.    I don’t know if this healthcare bill would actually raise the percentage of people who are insured because a lot of people out there do have common sense, and businesses will figure out that the 8% penalty is much less than what they would be required to pay otherwise.

So could you save money with Obamacare?  You probably can if you have a preexisting condition and need to consume a lot of health care.  On the other hand, this will cost a lot more for those who are young, healthy, or make too much money.   In the end, it is just and does not do anything at all to improve the quality of healthcare in this country.

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