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I don’t write very detailed numbers concerning my personal finances on this blog even though it is a personal finance blog. I always write some estimates and approximations and also things that have happened in the past. That seems a bit weird since I sort of advocated and being transparent about personal finance. I am actually really open with my close friends about my personal finances, but I do feel weird about revealing exact numerical details to the world. I also don’t keep a networth graph here like many other PF bloggers because I feel that is akin to . The hubby also doesn’t like to give out too much information. Anyway, today I decided to satisfy some personal finance voyeurs by posting our savings and expenses in terms of their percentages of our gross income. I took most of the numbers from our current paychecks, and some numbers are averages of bigger expenses.

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buy generic cialis online from canada- This includes Federal and California State Income taxes, Social Security and Medicare Taxes, and the CA SDI Tax. The total may seem a bit low because the income taxes are only taxed off our income after our fairly significant 401k deduction. The income taxes are also tiered, so only a portion of our money is taxed at the highest brackets. Though I am pretty sure we may owe some more taxes this year because I exercised some at the beginning of the year and we may trigger the AMT.

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Rent: 12.26% – We have been living here for less than a year, and when our lease is up in July the rent might go up, but we don’t think it would be too egregious because our landlord is not some huge corporation and we’re taking care of his apartment. We really do enjoy living here.

Car Insurance :1.71% – The hubby just recently got a rate reduction for being a good driver. It took about three phone calls to the insurance company but those phone calls saved us $400 per 6 months term so I am pretty happy about that.

Car maintenance : 1.08% – This is an monthly average of the amount of money we spent on maintaining our cars in the past 9 months or so. We actually spend big chunks of money at once. For example, my , but this happens rarely so I averaged it out.

Utilities: 1.1% – The main utilities we pay include cable internet, the hubby’s cellphone, and electricity.

Food: 4.69% – I feel that we spend quite a bit on food every month, but actually sometimes eating out is cheaper than cooking. For example, making a couple sandwiches at home actually costs a lot because deli meats and bread are getting expensive. A lot of the times the hubby and I just buy one dish and split it because restaurants give too much food anyway. There is a really good Thai place nearby so one time we just bought one curry dish for $10 and then cooked rice at home and stuffed ourselves.

Gas: 2.52% – We have been doing good at saving gas lately by driving slower.

Entertainment: 1.1% – As it was laid out in , we have a 2% ceiling on entertainment, but actually we never spend that much. On average we have spent about 1.1% per month, and that’s why the hubby is running a surplus that he wants to use on a computer in a few months.

Donations: around 6.5 to 8% – We upped our donations a bit this year and we’re donating more than before. The percentage seems a bit small when it is based off our gross income. In light of the recent disasters in Burma and China we also added a few special donations this and last month.

Other: 0.7% – This category includes things like gifts. It seems that there is always a birthday or wedding around the corner. The hubby has a gift account for such expenses.

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401k: 17% – We both contribute 17% of our paychecks into our company 401k plans. The hubby was pleasantly surprised when he bumped his contributions this year from 10% and 17% and barely noticed a dip in his take home pay. The reason is that his taxes were reduced accordingly.

529 plan: 0.72% – I have a 529 plan open with Fidelity for our future child(ren). Right now we are putting very little into it every month.

The rest: 31.21% – The rest of the savings currently is going into money market funds in our Vanguard joint account. I also funded our Roth IRAs for last year with our savings. I’m not sure if we’ll qualify for Roth IRA again this year since the hubby may be getting a raise soon, but we’ll see. This money is also our emergency fund and house down payment savings. It is growing quite a bit and I may buy some more mutual funds with it once it gets past 25% of our entire portfolio.

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I hope we can still save this much when we have kids, but I think we can afford to spend 15% of our income on a kid and still manage to save a good amount for the future. It is also good that we are able to essentially live on one income because this means we don’t have to worry if one of us loses employment. Anyway, it was fun to lay this out so I could see the flow of my money clearly, and I hope someone’s curiosity has been satisfied.

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A few weeks ago I stumbled upon a site named through a Google ad. I rarely click on Adsense ads, but this one intrigued me. The site presents a petition for renters to sign in hopes of stopping a housing bailout. I perused the site a little bit and figured that online petitions never really work, but I left a comment anyway and moved on.

Interestingly enough, this weekend I read an “expose” by The gist of the article is that Angry Renter is a fake grass roots campaign run by a non-profit organization called FreedomWorks.org ran by a bunch of fat cats including Steve Forbes. They also listed the expensive properties the leaders of the organization owns. They also quoted the president of FreedomWorks.org saying “I’m an angry homeowner who pays his mortgage”.

I found it funny that the Wall Street Journal needed to write this article because it shows that maybe Angry Renter is really pissing someone off. So what if Angry Renter is run by homeowners? Homeowners pay income taxes also, and I don’t think any sensible person wants their money to be used to prop up bubblicious housing prices so that their children cannot afford a reasonable home. I also don’t think anyone wants to contribute their hard earned money to banks that scoop in billions of dollars a year by being legal loan sharks. Though the site is biased, some of the statements on Angry Renter are true. For example, renters do not get tax rebates for renting, and for all intents and purposes, renting serves the same basic need as buying a home. Why is there such a clear discrimination? Renters do wield less political power because they own less money as a whole compared to the banks and homeowners. So what is the problem with one little non-profit group with rich donors wanting to give renters a voice?  Additionally, it is also true that most homeowners are responsible and didn’t buy into the housing bubble so that they don’t need a bailout.  So why should all of us suffer for the folly of a few?

I am just surprised that all of this is happening in America, a place that prides itself on freedom, democracy, and free market.  Why should people have the freedom to be stupid and irresponsible, but not be encouraged to manage their money wisely?  A general housing bailout seems to send the message that saving money for a downpayment and renting is stupid because as long as you bought a house the government will protect you.  Why don’t they apply bailouts to obsessive gamblers that were “tricked” by the , or stock speculators that lost their shirts during the dot com bubble?  Why is the housing bubble so special?  The answer is simply that the banks want their money back from people who can’t pay, and they are disguising their greed and grapple for survival as a humanitarian mission to “save the troubled homeowners”.  Give me a break because I don’t want to pay for mortgages that I did not sign for.

So the bottom line is, I don’t think you need to be a renter right now to be angry about the impending giant housing bailout. Currently, the House has passed a $300 billion bill for housing aid which . Unfortunately, old George only has a few months left in office and as long as the Democrats stay in power this housing bailout will probably go on regardless of how many signatures people collect.  Anyway, I hope more bailout bills never go through, but that is probably just wishful thinking.  Meanwhile, I will be a patient and maybe slightly angry renter.

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Well, it’s another milestone at !  This is the 200th post, and all of you kind readers have made over 1100 comments!  In my I briefly mentioned that I would like over 1000 visitors to this blog daily by the end of the year, and now I am up to 300 to 400 per day so it seems highly likely I could reach my goal.  Since then,   I also  joined a great community blog named and started a new blog about .  Between the three blogs now my writing gets over 2000 views per day.  That’s a huge improvement from just 100 to 200 visitors daily 5 months ago!

In terms of blog income, I have gone from  to nearly $600 this month.  All of the money I collect from blogging is currently donated to various charities.  It makes me happy when I see my articles earning money every day now, even when I am not writing.

With the growth of my blogs, I finally wrote  a to showcase all the mentions my writing have gotten on top blogs and other press.  Check it out for some of the most amusing and useful articles I’ve written.

I want to say thank you all for reading my writing.  It really makes my day when I hear that my random thoughts have helped you or made you laugh.  I know that I piss people off, too, but getting any kind of reaction means that I made someone read and think a little bit and that is also rewarding.

The more I write the more I think that my writing could be the best legacy I could leave.  I would love for my future descendants to read my stories and my parents’ stories to get a glimpse of how we lived.  I know I love to hear my mom’s stories about  my grandmother’s family. So hopefully I will can preserve this blog for those that come after me.  I also think it is amazing that the internet allows this rapid sharing of ideas and lives.

With that, I leave you with some great Blog Carnivals in the recent weeks:

– I didn’t really submit to this carnival but they included my article under Four Pillar’s name.  Sorry Mike, I don’t know what happened there.

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It’s been a while since I translated a chapter of my dad’s story of how we immigrated to America and started a new life.  This is a bonus  story he wrote at the end of Chapter 3 that doesn’t have much to do with his new college life.  Anyway, it is an episode in our lives that is worth mentioning.  For more of my dad’s narrative see the category marked . Enjoy!
—-

In the winter of 1992, I received an acceptance letter from Kap’iolani Community College.  Since I was an international student, I did not qualify for the inexpensive in state tuition.  The rate for international students was more than $1000 per semester.  Registration was due on 1/13 and classes started on 1/18.  When I was about to start school, two events happened.  One was a good thing, and the other was not.

First let me explain the joyous event.  When Helen was in college during the late 1970s she was a translator for a group of American educators that visited China.  Because of this she met an elementary teacher from Pensacola, Florida named Betty.  Betty’s husband was a retired military man of the United States Air Force.  At that time Betty was more than 60 years old but she was extremely interested in China.  After she met Helen she was quite interested in Helen’s education and life.  They became penpals for many years.  Even after we were married they kept on writing each other.  After Xin was born Betty was quite interested in Xin’s growth and education.  Everytime Xin had a birthday she would send some books and gifts.  When Helen arrived in Hawaii, the person that came to pick her up from the airport was Betty’s good friend.

After Xin and I came to America, Betty wrote us a letter saying that she is preparing a surprise for Xin.  Right before Christmas we received a letter from Los Angeles from a woman named Lynn.  In the envelope there were three roundtrip tickets from Hawaii to LA and three tickets to Disneyland worth 56 dollars each.  The letter said that we were invited as guests of the Presbyterian Church to a Christmas in Los Angeles.  Later we found out that this was the surprise Betty was talking about.

This was our first Christmas in America.  Lynn had a Ford, and she drove us from the Los Angeles Airport to her home.  Lynn is also a elementary school teacher, and her husband is a professor at UCLA.  They have two children, one boy and one girl.  The boy is the older child and his name is John.  He just graduated from college and his major was English.  However, he joined a fishing company and worked on the oceans as a fisherman.  I heard from Lynn that being a fisherman is hard and dangerous work and the pay was not spectacular, but John was  young and wanted to broaden his experience.  His parents thought that it was a good idea and did not protest.  At that time, I honestly didn’t understand the mindset of American parents.  I always thought that when children graduate from college they should go to graduate school and join academia, and I would never allow my child to do such hard and dangerous work.  However, after being in America for a while I understood more of the American educational system.  I think perhaps this type of hard labor is a lesson   American parents hope that their children could learn.  Perhaps in those dangerous waves, John could receive the inspiration Hemingway had when he wrote “The Old Man and the Sea”.

That week, Lynn’s church had a volunteer to drive us somewhere every single day.  We went to Disneyland and Xin was extremely excited and had a wonderful time.  Additionally,  we toured Hollywood and went to many different museums.  Nevertheless, that Christmas we were extremely happy.  I wanted to thank Lynn and her family for being such gracious hosts so I bought a chicken from the supermarket and made a Chinese style roast chicken.  I put many different ingredients and also sticky rice inside the stomach of the chicken and baked it for three hours until the skin was crispy and brown.  Lynn’s family tasted my chicken and praised it quite a bit, and said that I should visit them more often.

We could never forget that event and Betty’s love for our family.  A little over five years ago I and Helen visited Betty in Florida.  At that time, she was more than 80.  I cooked several Chinese dishes for her and when she heard that we both had great jobs and Xin was studying at UC Berkeley she felt very relieved.  Today, even though Betty already left us, her smiles and voice is still often remembered in our family.

Addendum from Xin:  I still remember that Christmas really clearly even thought it has been more than fifteen  years because it was beautiful.  The funniest moment I remember was that Lynn’s family sat down to pray over the food, and my dad didn’t quite understand it.  So when they said something like, “Thank you for this food”, my dad blurted out something like “no problem!” because he cooked the chicken.  My mom was embarrassed and then explained it to him later.  It’s still pretty funny when I think of it.

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This story comes from my friend   He has really finished working and is now traveling around Asia like a retirement hobo should.  He is sending his friends emails and I really liked this story so I asked him if I could post this story on my blog.  He said YAHHH!!! So here it is!
—–

Just wanted to share one day with you all.

A few days ago, a friend introduced me to his private mountain.  That’s right, a mountain.  He bought it years ago as an investment property but the license fell through and now he turned it into a farm where he and his family can camp out and eat fresh organic vegetables and tropical fruits he grows and barbecue fresh farmed trout from their pond.

We entered the gate that marked the mountain he owned…that’s right, a mountain…and it was so nice.  The weather was semi-tropical, a slight mist in the air, with the sunset beaming the day’s last rays through the myriad of trees, scattering light onto the stone path.  We drove a few hundred meters and reached his man-made cottage and barn.  There was some ducks and geese chilling by the lake and a bunch of vegetables and fruits growing in an orchard.

One of the fruits, when literally translated from Chinese (neither of us knew the English name) is called the “Fire Dragon Fruit” and was named because of its fire-reddish color that mixed in shades of orange and yellow (kinda like a mango) and it’s skin made it seem like it had scales (kinda like an artichoke).  It grew on a huge cactus that vined around and its flower was a huge tropical-looking red blossom (kinda like that plant that kills you in the movie, Jumanji).

His cottage had electricity and running water somehow (I’m guessing magic), and he put on a hot pot of water to boil some organic fresh tea he picked straight up from the garden.  We took a little hike and he pointed out the pond of fish, a waterfall and a creek, and various small reptiles and lizards.

We settle down on his porch and he tells me to get ready for some show that his magical mountain…that’s right, a magical mountain…was about to start.  He turns off all the lights and we wait.  A steady stream of water, frogs ribits, and other loud insects keeps the silence away while we wait.  Then a flicker of light flashes in the trees…too quick and sudden to be the sun, which has already completely set.  Then slowly, a chorus of small flashing lights, like lighters at a P-Diddy concert remembering B.I.G. while he raps “I’ll be missing you”, lights up the mountain.  Turns out, it was mating season for fireflies and his private mountain….that’s right, fireflies….was one of the few places left that had the right amount of water, humidity, firefly food for us to view them in the density that we saw.

Thousands of lights twinkle on and off lighting the forest.  We were able to catch them in our hands and make them flash lights to the music of Kanye West’s “Stronger” bumping from my iphone.  Well….not really, but we were able to catch them and that was kinda cool.

Anyways, that was one of my better days.  I hope the excruciatingly painful details I provided was a good alternative to my usual banter of falling off fences, psychobabble about father and son, and dudes that looks like ladies.  I’ll write some direct replies to your emails now too since I have all day on the internet today.

Until next time, kids.

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