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The New York Times recently published an that allows you to compare your debt situation to a group of more than 360 American families that were surveyed in 2004. After playing with it for a little bit, it was pretty clear that this survey indicates that those with more income are more likely to have debt. This led to me to ask, why is that those with more means seem to borrow more?

The calculator allows you to input your mortgage debt, credit card debt, automobile debt, and educational debt.  Then you can choose your income and age group on the bottom and it tells you how many percent of the families they surveyed are like you. So I put in $0 and less than 35 year old.  In my age bracket, 39% of families making less than $20,000 per year had no debt, and only 3% of families making more than $150,000 per year had no debt.  This is a very stark difference.  When I changed the age bracket to all age groups, 47% of families making under $20,000 had no debt while only 14% of families making more than $150,000 had no debt. That is still a very big difference.

I noticed that regardless of income, most of the debt of these families came in the form of mortgage. The average amount of mortgage debt goes up as you scroll up in income. This makes sense because more income allows people to qualify for larger mortgages.  Higher income families also tend to live in areas with high costs of living so housing is more expensive to begin with. Some would argue that mortgage is a type of “good” debt because it allows people to have a piece of real estate after it is paid off, but that alone  does not change the fact that it is a debt.

In all the other categories of debt, higher income families still owed more than lower income families on average.  The average automobile debt of families making over $150k  is nearly 9 times the automobile debt of a family making less than $20k.  All of this just shows that those with higher income spends much more on the same goods and services.

Personally I have lived in both ends of the income spectrum presented in this survey.  When we just moved to America we were living on one graduate stipend.  All three of us lived on less than $1000 a month and we watched our expenses day to day.  Nothing was bought without a coupon, and the damaged foods section is where we shopped first. When my family was at that income level, frugality was necessary for survival  and  there is no room for debt because one credit card interest charge could mean a week’s worth of groceries.

Later, my parents graduated and we moved to the San Francisco Bay Area.  They both had well paying jobs after a few years, and they took on a mortgage. A big change I noticed is that we no longer cut out every coupon we found for food and we ate out much more.  It was much easier to spend money because we had more income than before.  The rationale was that coupons were no longer worth the time and effort to redeem, and paying for good food was great because we can’t cook like that anyway. Being frugal is just harder when you have the means to spend your money and justify it later as only 0.25% of your salary.

Though, having said this, I would like to clarify that my family was never that extravagant and got in any debt other than their mortgages. Also, I think it would more interesting if the NY Times reported the amount of assets these families had and see if these families could cover the amount of the debt they have.  If the higher income families had enough assets to make their net worths positive, then they are not too badly off.  If they had the most debt and least assets, then they are really in trouble.

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Well, I’m reading some panic-inducing headlines lately about the Dow going down 20% and how it is worst June since the Great Depression.  Recently my mom asked if I were selling my investments lately, and I  said no way.  Here are some of the reasons why I am not panicking and keeping my portfolio intact.

does generic cialis work  -  The hubby and I have a cash reserve that could last more than a year of our expenses.  So there is no need to touch our long term investments.
does generic cialis work – Most mutual fund investors do not get the long term gains as advertised by the funds because of panic selling at low points.  Since most of my portfolio is in funds, I am keeping them still to get the long term benefits.

does generic cialis work – Yes, my portfolio has gone down a few percentage points, but overall I still have gains because I have been investing for more than three years.  So if I do sell now, I still have capital gains taxes to pay, and that doesn’t seem to be worthwhile.

does generic cialis work This is an election year, so volatility is to be expected since there are a lot of uncertainties. Additionally, the turmoil in the credit/finance industry has not totally settled yet. I would be more worried if there was no volatility and the markets are shooting straight up because that might indicate another bubble.

At this point, the best thing for long term investors to do is to not look at the market.  A funny story I read at the Vanguard Diehards forums said that a photographer asked one of the Bogleheads  “How’s the market doing?”, and someone answered, “I don’t know and I don’t care!”. I like that attitude.  I think   my portfolio is fairly well diversified and I am comfortable with its long term growth, so I am just leaving it alone.  If I look at it too much, I might be tempted to do something stupid, and that could be disastrous.

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Lately, one news story that has been really getting on my nerves is that of Laura Richardson, the Southern California congresswoman who defaulted on three separate homes repeatedly and most likely used her influence to that has already been sold. The investor that bought her home has against the congresswoman and Washington Mutual for illegally rescinding a proper sale. I hope the buyer James York wins because there was no possible way that the congresswoman didn’t know about the sale. She didn’t pay her mortgage for more than six months!! What did she think was supposed to happen? After the congresswoman’s mortgage troubles were publicized, more information came to light that she has a history of being a deadbeat and and . She took money out of her three homes to finance her campaigns, and made only a few payments on her Sacramento home. If debtors’ prisons were still in operation, this woman would be sitting in jail right now eating gruel . Instead, she is being in her honor to help her with her debts. One thing that made me laugh and cry at the same time was that in this she said “she is like any other American suffering in the mortgage crisis and wants to testify to Congress about her experience as lawmakers craft a foreclosure-prevention bill.” Right, she is just like any other American that buys three homes, pulls money out, stops paying the mortgage and property taxes, and then denies that she knew anything about an oncoming foreclosure. That is really believable and poignant!

Apparently, Laura Richardson is not the only representative with mortgage woes. A less publicized case is of state Senator Julia Boseman of North Carolina. She and her ex-partner Melissa Jarrellon their $1.3 million dollar mansion since August 1, 2007. In order to clean her own hands, Boseman has taken herself off the home’s deed without her ex-partner’s knowledge. The house is set to be auctioned, and I hope Boseman doesn’t use her political clout to take the house back like Laura Richardson did.

Finally, we have the bizarre story of Shirley Huntley, a state Senator from New York. She stopped paying her mortgage intentionally as an to see if she gets proper notification from her bank. After four months of not paying her mortgage and facing foreclosure, she paid up everything plus legal fees to avoid foreclosure. According to the article, her “original mortgage in 1976 was $28,500. Three decades later, she owes $290,000 due to repeated borrowing against her home”. So did she really conduct an experiment or did she just try to cover up some financial trouble? Either way, at least this woman owned up to her debt and paid it off. The alarming thing is that she used her home as an ATM so that her initial debt ballooned to more than 10 times of its original size.

With representatives like these, I guess I understand why the housing bailout is so popular. Congressional rules do not prevent representatives from voting on issues that help themselves financially because it is hard to avoid, but is supporting financial irresponsibility really wise? Anyway, all members of Congress and the Senate are required to report their personal finances and you can see the reports at . I encourage all of you to take a look at your local politicians and see how responsible they are with their own money, because I believe a person really needs to get his or her own affairs in order before making laws that affect millions of other people.

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Today I read a rather refreshing article called on the LA Times. Basically it tells the story of an ordained pastor named Dave Dixon who gave away pretty much all of his possessions and started to live on a boat and sing songs in a restaurant a few hours a week. His expenses are $565 per month, and he says that “time, not money, is the real commodity in life”. He says that his lifestyle is divinely inspired and “sees himself living out God’s message that faith and people, not possessions, are what is of true value.”

Interestingly enough, I wrote on Wise Bread and this article reflects the first proverb I wrote about, “does generic cialis work Time is definitely more precious than money, and Dave Dixon has that figured out.  Additionally, I think it’s great to see that someone realizes that you really don’t need much to survive in this world.  My friend the Retirement Hobo said that in South East Asia he was able to eat well on $1 a day, and $10000 is a good retirement fund there.  He might be exaggerating a bit, but I really think that if we are able to let go of a lot of luxury that we have we can live well on very little money.

I think it is awesome that this pastor Dixon seems to trust God so much with his lifestyle.  Though, it’s funny that the author of the article describes Dave as “quixotic” multiple times in the article. Obviously, some people might think that Dave is a fool for trusting God with his health and not having health insurance, but  apparently God provided for him when he had a kidney stone.  He may seem like a stupid bum living on a rickety boat, but I know so many people with huge houses that they slave over and complain about.  Can these people with so many more possessions than Dave Dixon say that they are really truly free and happy?  Dave said in the article, “my possessions made me work harder and stole my time”, and I agree with that sentiment.  We all have an extremely ephemeral existence on this earth, and for us to devote so much time and effort to acquire things we can’t bring with us to the next life is quite pointless.

Now, would I sell everything  and go live on a boat?  Probably not because I don’t like boats very much, but I wouldn’t mind living in a faraway city in Asia where rent is less than $100 a month.  I could even have a little piece of land where I can plant some tomatoes, peas, and corn, and raise a few chickens and ducks.  These are all things I had when I was a kid in China, and really that’s all I need to be happy.  It is a dream lifestyle that is so far removed  from my current daily grind in a glass tower, and maybe one day I can convince the hubby to go there.

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Lately my mom has been telling me that several friends of hers are snapping up real estate in the East Bay because prices have fallen anywhere from 20% to 70%. She argues that if I ever see a property that has a mortgage lower than my rent I should just buy it. Well, hasn’t really fallen to the extent that any mortgage is cheaper than a comparable rent yet. The average price per square foot in my zipcode is currently $571. We live in a place that’s about 1040 square foot and pay $1700 a month. So the purchase price for a comparable property would be $592.8k and it still doesn’t make sense to buy since I am 99% positive prices are still going down right now. Financially, it’s more beneficial to us to invest all the money we are saving rather than being tied to a $3000+ mortgage.

Financial considerations aside, I don’t think we’re very enthusiastic to be homeowners because of the maintenance it would involve. I read a pretty funny article on Salon.com recently about a. His conclusion was, “What the hell was I thinking?” He didn’t have the money to fix all the problems his home had and he didn’t have the skills to do it himself. While I am a renter I could just ask my landlord to repair the leaky pipes or replace the broken stove. Sure, I am paying rent, but I consider it to be outsourcing home maintenance to my landlord. The simple fact that renting is actually cheaper than the mortgage and property taxes makes the arrangement a sweeter deal for me.

Another ridiculous argument people have thrown in my face as why owning is better is that, “it’s better for the children.” I have no idea why this is remotely true. As long as children have a safe and loving place to call home, it doesn’t matter if their parents rent or own. I would actually argue that a home ripped apart by the financial stress of an unaffordable mortgage is a much worse place for a child to grow up than a family that happily rents without financial trouble. So before anyone tells me that I have to raise my kids in a place I own ever again, consider that I can rent in an excellent school district for less than 13% of our salary. On the flipside to own the same property in those school districts we would have to carry double or triple that cost. The money we save by renting could be used for tutors or a college fund for our kids. Renting gives us flexibility to live wherever we want, and that freedom is extremely valuable.

The hubby and I are pretty sure we won’t stay in our present condo forever, but I don’t know if homeownership is ever going to be right for us. I think I will only considering owning when it is cheaper than renting and we decide to stay in one area for more than ten years. If that never happens, then we just might rent forever. For me, I feel much more secure in managing a gigantic portfolio rather than a gigantic house. Currently my portfolio already generates enough income to cover approximately half of my rent, and to tie a lot of these perfectly sound liquid investments up in a house seems rather stupid at this point.

Anyway, here ends yet another one of my rants against the overrated ideal of homeownership. I think what frustrates me and several other of my friends is that our Asian parents are unhealthily obsessed with real estate and our parents want us to become indentured servants to the banks as soon as possible. I probably have enough material for that to fill up another ten blog posts, but I shall stop here. Finally I shall say that homeownership is not proof of adulthood or financial security. The ability to logically analyze your means and make responsible choices is better than succumbing to the pressures of society and doing something you regret later.

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