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cialis super active

This is something that has confounded and annoyed me for months if not years. Basically, buying a home always has a moniker in the media as “The American Dream”. This is actually one of the main selling point of the realtors and home builders when they try to sell to first time buyers. I really don’t understand why having a giant load of debt is considered desirable and why it should be a “dream”. So I researched the term “American Dream”, and found that it was defined in a history book by James Truslow Adams entitled cialis super active (1931). The book states, “If, as I have said, the things already listed were all we had to contribute, America would have made no distinctive and unique gift to mankind. But there has been also the cialis super active, that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for every man, with opportunity for each according to his ability or achievement.” (p. 404). So why is the phrase “American Dream” now synonymous with being a home-debtor?

Maybe I am just not American enough and don’t understand this madness, but it seems that the “American Dream” has been twisted through the years to mean bigger homes, more expensive cars, and better electronics. It has become a marketing ploy for people to dive into materialism and lost most of its original sense of hope and goodness. I could see how owning a home could be a facet of the “American Dream” when a house represents the culmination of the owner’s hard work, but when that home is financed entirely by debt it contains nothing of the buyer’s efforts. When people buy things on credit and slip further and further into debt they’re not living “The American Dream”. Instead, I think they’re living what I would call an “American Delusion”, and eventually it spirals into the “American Nightmare” if they can no longer handle their debt obligations.

I think the modern American Dream as we know it is a lie. It’s purely a slogan for the credit card companies to spur on spending, or a line for politicians to garnish their speeches. As an immigrant I still hold on to a tiny piece of what the original dream is. I don’t think it’s about consumerism or materialism. It’s about getting a fair chance to achieve success through patience and hard work. It’s about building up a better life in a place where opportunities are abundant and available to anyone. The Dream is an ideal that can’t be bought, but unfortunately it has devolved into instant gratification and debt.

As I write this article a song is playing in my head and it accurately describes how I feel about America and the reality of the American Dream as it is now and I will share a little of it here:
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I'm travelin' down the road,I'm flirtin' with disaster.

I've got the pedal to the floor,

My life is running faster.

I'm out of money, I'm out of hope,

It looks like self destruction.

Well how much more can we take,

With all of this corruption.Been flirtin' with disaster,

Ya'll know what I mean.

And the way we run our lives,

It makes no sense to me.

I don't know about yourself or,

What you want to be - YEAH.

When we gamble with our time,

We choose our destiny.

Chorus:

I'm travelin' down that lonesome road.

Feel like I'm dragging a heavy load.

Yeah! I've tried to turn my head away,

Feels about the same most every day.

I hope you’re not dragging a heavy load and flirtin’ with disaster, but I would like to know what your definition of the American Dream is. Are you living it right now? Are you as disturbed as me that the America we live in today portrays the quintessence of the American Dream as consumerism and materialism?

—————————————————————————————————-

If you absolutely have to borrow , never even go for something like . They don’t take much time in becoming and then you will suffer from too.

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cialis super activeon 11.28.07 at 5:04 pm

Love your analysis of this often used term! My definition of the American Dream has more to do with TIME and FREEDOM than consumerism. Yes, I am living MY American Dream!

cialis super activeon 11.28.07 at 5:44 pm

Good post. Many people jump at a chance to own a home without considering their financial situation.

I would like to work 3 days a week and volunteer 2 days a week. I’d also like to own my own place, but I’m not looking for huge places. A small condo would do, with a mortgage that is affordable and wouldn’t limit my dreams.

cialis super activeon 11.28.07 at 9:25 pm

excellent post. America dream can be considered as materials as a house, cars or other stuffs. For me, after immigrating to America for more than 15 years, I think it dose more than just materials stuffs. I think America dream means more opportunities for you and your kids to explore. Anyway, having a dream is better than in a place where you can not dream.

cialis super activeon 11.28.07 at 10:52 pm

Outside – The Tribe

Through the windshield, on the footbridge
They cling to each other at the close of day
They’ve not a care for the crush of traffic
Their captive audience, they say
Look we’ve each other
What more could we ask for
We’re right where we want to be
We’re right where we want to be
And my heart skips and I twist a little
And the light’s green and I drive away
I think who knows
What it is what it might be
I know anything goes
I’ve been there don’t remind me
All kinds of twisted thoughts
Swirling through her head
She’s already wondering about the baby
And look at him, watch his eyes
Who knows could be
He’s already gone for the weekend in his mind
So here I am All on my own
Looking around Sun is shining
In all directions And now I feel
The wave inside And now I feel
The wave inside I’ll hide my smile

And I remember from one of Cake’s songs “As soon as you’re born you start dying, so you might as well have a good time”. What they failed to include on the final cut was as soon as you’re born you rack up debt.

cialis super activeon 11.30.07 at 10:44 am

Funny.. I was talking about this exact subject with someone yesterday.

Our society has become too materialistic.

cialis super activeon 11.30.07 at 10:55 am

Great post! I’ve grown up in America. The American Dream has (in my opinion) always been portrayed as having an attractive spouse, two kids (boy and girl), a fancy car, and a big house in the ‘burbs.

The real American Dream is “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” Unfortunately, the pursuit of happiness has been mixed up with the pursuit of expensive crap that nobody needs. :-)

cialis super activeon 12.03.07 at 5:42 am

[...] Baglady presents When Did the American Dream Become Debt? I wish more people felt this way. Consumerism and consumption is not a dream for me. There are at [...]

cialis super activeon 12.03.07 at 6:47 am

[...] When Did the American Dream Become Debt “This is something that has confounded and annoyed me for months if not years. Basically, buying a home always has a moniker in the media as “The American Dream”. This is actually one of the main selling point of the realtors and home builders when they try to sell to first time buyers. I really don’t understand why having a giant load of debt is considered desirable and why it should be a “dream.”” [...]

cialis super activeon 12.03.07 at 10:35 am

[...] When Did the American Dream Become Debt? [...]

cialis super activeon 12.03.07 at 1:42 pm

[...] did the concept of the American dream devolve into the American nightmare? The concept started out as a noble one, writes The Baglady, who traced it to “The Epic of America” [...]

cialis super activeon 12.03.07 at 11:47 pm

[...] Bag Lady wonders when the American Dream became debt [...]

cialis super activeon 12.04.07 at 11:19 am

[...] the editors pick I particularly liked When American dream become debt; a dream compared with a delusion that too as delusion of being rich was [...]

cialis super activeon 12.04.07 at 12:31 pm

I gotta say, I couldn’t disagree more. Owning a home is the American Dream. A mortgage makes it possible for most of us. Since when is using debt to acquire an appreciating asset a negative thing? Besides which, it’s paying for something while you use it. How does that make it any worse than renting?

A car loan makes it possible to pay as you go while using the car, but at the end of the loan, you still have a car.

I’m sorry, but debt isn’t bad. Irresponsible debt is. Going into debt to buy that new plasma big screen I want, while I have a perfectly good TV now is irresponsible. Going in vacation with debt is irresponsible. Buying too much car with debt is irresponsible.

There is nothing good or evil about debt, just how it is used or abused.

cialis super activeon 12.04.07 at 1:16 pm

Hi Kevin, I wasn’t saying that owning a home shouldn’t be the American Dream, and you’re right in saying that there is nothing good or evil about debt. My article’s point was that in recent times debt has been glamorized through consumerism and the American Dream has been fundamentally altered. I also said that when people can’t handle their debt anymore they are in an American nightmare. I don’t think anyone can deny that. So I am not sure what you’re disagreeing with.

cialis super activeon 12.04.07 at 9:51 pm

[...] When Did “The American Dream” Become Debt? — This article has been featured as an editor’s pick at the Carnival of Personal Finance at Cash Money Life and the Carnival of Debt Reduction at Blogging Away Debt! Additionally it was linked by Karen Datko of MSN money’s SmartSpending blog. [...]

cialis super activeon 12.07.07 at 2:12 pm

[...] The Bag Lady writes about the equivocation of the American Dream with mortgage debt. [...]

cialis super activeon 12.08.07 at 6:34 am

[...] BagLady had a very good post on the so called “American Dream” which also relates quite closely to real [...]

cialis super activeon 12.08.07 at 12:35 pm

I was just thinking about this the other day. I own my home and my own business. I am living the American Dream. Now if I could just pay off my debts, save up for retirement and still afford to eat. :) Now on the bright side, most of that is still within my control and it’s getting better.

Great Post, and I love that song!

cialis super activeon 12.09.07 at 11:24 am

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cialis super activeon 12.11.07 at 3:07 pm

yes I am living the american dream!!

cialis super activeon 12.12.07 at 5:15 am

I agree with you on the real definition of the American dream. I also see it as freedom, the chance to rise on one’s own abilities, opportunity. I think it is odd that in popular parlance, or at least in advertising, it equals owning a home. Never ever growing up did I equate home ownership with the American dream, which leads me to think that it is a slogan that has arisen recently. However, I don’t know if I agree with you regarding the debt issue. Debt allows those of us who don’t inherit an estate at adulthood to buy a home and gradually own it. It also allows us to cover ourselves in case of emergency and to have fun before the reimbursement check or next paycheck comes in. It seems from reading the personal finance blogosphere that many people really have problems with debt, and I agree that there are many cultural forces that lead people to take on more than is wise. But as long as people are rational and don’t bite off more than they can chew, debt is positive. Read “The Mystery of Capital.” I don’t know about this, but I remember reading that the incentives for people to buy houses on credit has driven up prices, so I guess that is a negative aspect of debt.

cialis super activeon 12.13.07 at 8:08 pm

In my opinion the “American Dream” is part of the sales pitch here and has always been sold to foreigners, and is still being sold even by word of mouth since there hasn’t been a noticable lack in legal or illegal immigration to my knowledge. It morphs to whatever people want to hear, streets paved with gold, jobs ripe for the plucking, never go hungry, whatever. The real power of the dream is, if you work hard, work smart, you can lead a good life here. Often better than where you left. The problem is that the advertising is changing what people see as the good life as they find better and better marketing strategies to dig into our fears and insecurities. Resist the marketing, decide what living the good life really means to you, and then go for it.

cialis super activeon 12.26.07 at 3:00 pm

I couldn’t agree more that the American Dream has certainly changed a lot. It is funny, but I think my American Dream is to just be able to pay my bills without worry, and it seems like other people consider the American Dream to be what they own (or what the credit card company owns).

I think as we get older too, our dreams shift so much. When I was younger, all I cared about was having the BEST of everything. Now I just want to own the good stuff I already have ;)

cialis super activeon 01.16.08 at 11:11 am

[...] Email: Beware of Crappy Condo Assessment Fees When Did “The American Dream” Become Debt 8 Holiday Shopping Tips from The Baglady Stop Buying Things That No One Will Ever EVER Need! (My [...]

cialis super activeon 04.30.08 at 4:35 pm

I surrendered to it long ago. Keeping you income to debt ratio down is an admirable endeavor, but life knocks for 80 years with luck or even less … a lot of stuff people could never get if it weren’t for debt. It’s not always bad I don’t think … then again, what do we really need that we have to borrow so much for?

cialis super activeon 07.22.08 at 6:55 am

[...] average American is currently carrying at least some form of debt, even if it is small. We live in a society where [...]

cialis super activeon 12.11.08 at 4:32 pm

With so many foreclosures. I wonder where all these posters stand today. Have any of them lost their homes? I agree America has become too materialistic. To the poster. How do you feel now with so many filing for bankruptcy and facing foreclosure?

cialis super activeon 01.14.09 at 3:10 pm

[...] my mind, the California dream is much more glamorous and adventurous than the so called “American Dream”.   For example, every Chinese person I know still calls San Francisco “Old Gold [...]

cialis super activeon 12.16.09 at 6:57 am

The concept that things on the outside will change how we feel on the inside might not be true. I used to believe in the American Dream but after thinking about it, it seems empty. A lack of money for me has lead to an appreciation of the simpler things in life, like a cup of coffee or a sunset or love. In America there seems to be an obsession with money when you turn on the tv thats all we hear about. You can have the best life style in the world but if there is no one there you care for it doesn’t amount to much. We need a certain amount of money to live and if you can live on dreams maybe its a good thing. For me just dreams are frustrating and unfullfilling. We have a lot of things here in the US but a lot of depression to.

cialis super activeon 03.16.10 at 10:01 pm

Great observation. It is sad that over-consumption and overspending are celebrated as economic growth, while values like sustainability and thrift are considered painfully un-American.

Hopefully, we can get back to a balanced understanding of the “America Dream” that is rooted in relationships and not more stuff.

Keep up the good work,
Eric

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