<%3Fxml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"%3F> Generic cialis no prescription australia » Viagra from canadian pharmacy | Shipping Worldwide. http://baglady.dreamhosters.com/2007/10/07/san-mateo-home-sellers-in-trouble-1/ Attempts at a Sustainable Lifestyle... Thu, 04 Aug 2011 01:25:53 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.3.1 Generic cialis no prescription australia » Viagra from canadian pharmacy | Shipping Worldwide. http://baglady.dreamhosters.com/2007/10/07/san-mateo-home-sellers-in-trouble-1/comment-page-1/#comment-1914 May 2008 Update - 463% Increase of Troubled Home Sellers Since October 2007 : San Mateo Home Sellers in Trouble - Bay Area Real Estate Bubble Updates Sun, 01 Jun 2008 04:37:00 +0000 http://baglady.dreamhosters.com/2007/10/07/san-mateo-home-sellers-in-trouble-1/#comment-1914 [...] listings.  In October 2007 I started this series and I scoured all of San Mateo county and found only 102 home sellers in trouble.   This means that in less than 8 months the number of home sellers in trouble rose 463%!!  A lot [...] [...] listings.  In October 2007 I started this series and I scoured all of San Mateo county and found only 102 home sellers in trouble.   This means that in less than 8 months the number of home sellers in trouble rose 463%!!  A lot [...]

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Generic cialis no prescription australia » Viagra from canadian pharmacy | Shipping Worldwide. http://baglady.dreamhosters.com/2007/10/07/san-mateo-home-sellers-in-trouble-1/comment-page-1/#comment-895 San Mateo Home Sellers in Trouble #8 - 12/2/2007 to 12/16/2007 Plus Huge Update on October’s Troubled Homes — The Baglady Tue, 18 Dec 2007 07:51:42 +0000 http://baglady.dreamhosters.com/2007/10/07/san-mateo-home-sellers-in-trouble-1/#comment-895 [...] some of the older reports. I examined the approximately 150 homes from the first two reports listed here and here and the findings are quite [...] [...] some of the older reports. I examined the approximately 150 homes from the first two reports listed here and here and the findings are quite [...]

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Generic cialis no prescription australia » Viagra from canadian pharmacy | Shipping Worldwide. http://baglady.dreamhosters.com/2007/10/07/san-mateo-home-sellers-in-trouble-1/comment-page-1/#comment-830 Sirens and Sharks : agentgenius.com Thu, 13 Dec 2007 00:39:52 +0000 http://baglady.dreamhosters.com/2007/10/07/san-mateo-home-sellers-in-trouble-1/#comment-830 [...] It’s not just agents who are publicly criticizing  buyers who were “stupid” enough to get into a subprime loan.   A recent contribution by the Bag Lady drew critical, scathing comments by readers who were on the se... [...] [...] It’s not just agents who are publicly criticizing  buyers who were “stupid” enough to get into a subprime loan.   A recent contribution by the Bag Lady drew critical, scathing comments by readers who were on the se… [...]

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Generic cialis no prescription australia » Viagra from canadian pharmacy | Shipping Worldwide. http://baglady.dreamhosters.com/2007/10/07/san-mateo-home-sellers-in-trouble-1/comment-page-1/#comment-527 San Mateo Home Sellers in Trouble #6 — 11/05/07 to 11/18/07 — Nearly 20% of New Listings In Trouble — The Baglady Mon, 19 Nov 2007 10:26:41 +0000 http://baglady.dreamhosters.com/2007/10/07/san-mateo-home-sellers-in-trouble-1/#comment-527 [...] statistics I gathered in this page, and if you missed any part of this series you can start reading here. Another update will be posted in two weeks. Finally, I will present to you my favorite photo of [...] [...] statistics I gathered in this page, and if you missed any part of this series you can start reading here. Another update will be posted in two weeks. Finally, I will present to you my favorite photo of [...]

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Generic cialis no prescription australia » Viagra from canadian pharmacy | Shipping Worldwide. http://baglady.dreamhosters.com/2007/10/07/san-mateo-home-sellers-in-trouble-1/comment-page-1/#comment-314 Vicki Moore Mon, 22 Oct 2007 19:05:19 +0000 http://baglady.dreamhosters.com/2007/10/07/san-mateo-home-sellers-in-trouble-1/#comment-314 Disclosure: I'm a realtor. I believe there should be compassion here. We're talking about families. In my experience, people who bought homes and are now in a dire situation of having to sell have been caught in a somewhat unexpected turn of events. So many circumstances have conspired against them that they are now backed against a wall. Hypothetical to explain my point: 1. They were qualified for a loan that no longer exists. The loan requirements have gotten much more restrictive. The parameters that allowed them to qualify to purchase initially are now not enough to allow them to refinance. 2. The value of the home has declined, also making them unable to refinance. The appraisal will not be calculated at a high enough price. 3. Their loans have gone from fixed to adjustable, adding another $1500+/- to their house payment. 4. Inventory has risen so much that their home is one of many as opposed to when they purchased, they themselves as buyers were one of many. The factor that most determines the value of a house is what a willing buyer will pay for it and what a willing seller will sell for. I don't believe there were any gimmicks or tricks. Money was cheap - it was very inexpensive to take out a loan - so much so that even folks that had the money to deposit on a home didn't because it was less expensive to get it from the bank. There was a time when it was certainly a frenzy; homes were selling within a week. That is not normal. I also believe that a comparison of one year is not enough time. Flipping is a recent phenomenon. Traditionally home ownership has been a purchase and hold proposition, not a purchase and immediate sell. It's only in recent years that people have looked at their home as a lottery ticket. In the past, the home has been a place to raise a family and possibly move up in 10 or so years. Hopefully it will return to being thought of as a safe place to live and enjoy life and not a way to buy a new car or finance that exotic vacation. The Peninsula itself is an anomoly. We're surrounded by water; a huge percentage of the land is reserved for parkland (something like 70%); the weather is incredible; jobs abundant; and land to build more homes in short supply. My crystal ball is broken. I can't say for sure what's coming in the real estate market. But I can look at past history to get an idea. I've run the statistics many times in many ways. The cost of housing will continue to rise. There may be blips here and there - like we're having now - but it's temporary. Disclosure: I’m a realtor. I believe there should be compassion here. We’re talking about families. In my experience, people who bought homes and are now in a dire situation of having to sell have been caught in a somewhat unexpected turn of events. So many circumstances have conspired against them that they are now backed against a wall.

Hypothetical to explain my point:
1. They were qualified for a loan that no longer exists. The loan requirements have gotten much more restrictive. The parameters that allowed them to qualify to purchase initially are now not enough to allow them to refinance.
2. The value of the home has declined, also making them unable to refinance. The appraisal will not be calculated at a high enough price.
3. Their loans have gone from fixed to adjustable, adding another $1500+/- to their house payment.
4. Inventory has risen so much that their home is one of many as opposed to when they purchased, they themselves as buyers were one of many.

The factor that most determines the value of a house is what a willing buyer will pay for it and what a willing seller will sell for. I don’t believe there were any gimmicks or tricks. Money was cheap – it was very inexpensive to take out a loan – so much so that even folks that had the money to deposit on a home didn’t because it was less expensive to get it from the bank. There was a time when it was certainly a frenzy; homes were selling within a week. That is not normal.

I also believe that a comparison of one year is not enough time. Flipping is a recent phenomenon. Traditionally home ownership has been a purchase and hold proposition, not a purchase and immediate sell.

It’s only in recent years that people have looked at their home as a lottery ticket. In the past, the home has been a place to raise a family and possibly move up in 10 or so years. Hopefully it will return to being thought of as a safe place to live and enjoy life and not a way to buy a new car or finance that exotic vacation.

The Peninsula itself is an anomoly. We’re surrounded by water; a huge percentage of the land is reserved for parkland (something like 70%); the weather is incredible; jobs abundant; and land to build more homes in short supply.

My crystal ball is broken. I can’t say for sure what’s coming in the real estate market. But I can look at past history to get an idea. I’ve run the statistics many times in many ways. The cost of housing will continue to rise. There may be blips here and there – like we’re having now – but it’s temporary.

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